How Southern Democrats Become Southern Republicans

Hey there reader.  I hope you’re doing great.  Many people today believe the Republicans are still the Party of Lincoln.  I on the other hand disagree: I looked at the intersection of geography and partisan voting patterns of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to find out which factor had more of an effect.  Notice, the Democratic party controlled both chambers of the 88th Congress.

Geography

More than 90 percent of non-southerners voted for the bill while less than 10 percent of southerners voted for it, an 80 point difference in favor of the non-south.

Party

In the Senate, 69 percent of Democrats voted for the bill while 84 percent of Republicans voted for the bill, a 15 point difference in favor of the Republicans. In the House, 63 percent of Democrats voted for the bill while 85 percent of Republicans voted for it, a 22 point difference in favor of the Republicans.

Geography and Party

9 percent of southern Democrats voted for the bill while southern Republicans voted for the bill, a 9 point difference in favor of the southern Democrats.

Analysis

The 80 point difference in geography is greater than the 15 and 22 point difference in chamber-partisanship. And the 80 point difference is greater than the 9 point difference in geography and party.

Conclusion

Geography played more of a role in voting on the Civil Rights Act than partisanship: the non-southern Democrats/Republicans defeated the southern Democrats/Republicans on Civil Rights. Southern Democrats became southern Republicans in 1968 in spite of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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kristianberhost@gmail.com

I want to write about new experiences, the people I meet and the things I learn. I moved from Tempe, AZ to Arlington, VA with my dog 3 years ago. We love it here.

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